Simple Testing Games for Young Learners

This post is dedicated to classrooms which are shielded from the influence of Web 2.0, technophobes, and those who want to take a break from the LCD screens.

I like these games in particular because they are very simple and moreover can be applied in any subject, ranging from mathematics to social sciences to languages. While theoretical subjects can capitalize on these games to improve the knowledge of the learners, languages can focus on the speaking skills, fluency and vocabulary aspects.

Although, I’m writing this with young learners in my mind, these games can also be used for adult learners. I’m listing some of my favourite games in this post.

Just a Minute (JAM)
In this game the learner is given a topic and a minute’s time to speak on it. During this one minute, the flow should be consistent and there must be no interruptions in the flow of ideas. The students can be allowed to choose the topic by drawing lots which makes it even more interesting. I would suggest reserving 5-6 minutes every class for such a session to recapitulate the day’s lessons.

Shipwrecked
This is one of my favourite role play games. In this game, the students are organized into pairs. The scene of this game is set on a sinking ship with just one life jacket. Each learner is given the role of a character/object. They must speak for a minute highlighting their positives and why they deserve the life jacket more than the other.

Word Tail
This is a class activity where the teacher initiates the word tail with one word and selects a student to say a couple of sentences about it. Following this, the student gets to extend the tail by selecting a related word and posing it to his/her classmate. The word tail can be extended as long as the teacher wishes to. I like this game because, it often goes beyond the realms of the textbook and you won’t believe the connections which the kids make with just a few words from their lessons.

What’s the Good Word?
The teacher thinks of a word and gives a clue. If the student guesses the answer with that clue, they get 3 points. If they don’t, the teacher gives a second clue and if the student gets it right, they get 2 points. If they don’t get it after the second clue, the teacher gives a third clue and if the student gets it right, they get 1 point. The rule is that only single words can be used as clues, unless you want to use a proper noun. When the student gets the answer, that student can think of another word and pose it to their classmates.

Wordfire
The teacher opens the game with a word and selects a student. The student must come up with a related word and point out to another student who must come up with another word that relates to the one said by the first student. This is a rapid fire game and each student gets a maximum of 5 seconds to come up with a word.

Got anymore games? Do share them with me!

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Published in: on December 6, 2010 at 22:28  Comments (3)  
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Video Games – Child’s Play

This post is a summary and a reflection of my thoughts on this week’s #ptchat. Gaming has evolved over a period of time and has now become an integral part of childhood.

The #ptchat convo began on an apprehensive note with tweeps expressing their concern over the degree of violence in games. As an ex-gamer I have seen and played many such games. These games do have a serious impact on kids. As @StressFreeKids mentioned, these games have physiological and psychological effects on them.

Violent Video GamesParental guidance is extremely important when it comes to selection of games for kids. Games do come with warning stickers but who reads them. Many parents don’t know what these games contain. Parents must look for the ESRB rating on games before they get them for kids. Sometimes kids bring game discs from their friends and even these must be checked by parents before they let them play.

ESRB Labels

 

However, not all video games are to be shunned. Video games can prove to be an excellent resource for developing many skills. In my opinion, these games can be used as a dynamic tool to enhance creativity and learning skills in kids. Video games are not just any visual medium, but it is that which can be controlled by the kids. Game-based learning is now gaining momentum and I have observed significant improvement in learning, understanding and retention abilities in kids. I’ll be sharing my experience on gaming and learning in subsequent posts.

Agree/disagree with me? Do share your views with me here.

Published in: on November 5, 2010 at 21:49  Comments (2)  
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